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Monday
Feb222010

« About Fremont: WSDA's New Home »

The colors of Fremont: Part European village, part restaurant mecca, Fremont has continued to evolve while nurturing its off-beat persona. Marching to its own quirky beat, Fremont bills itself as “the center of the universe,” and claims “De Libertas Quirkas”  (Free to be Peculiar), as its motto. But don’t let the oddball assertions fool you: Fremont’s location and business acumen have landed it some exceptional business tenants.

Once a separate city, Fremont was annexed to Seattle in 1891. Named after Fremont, Nebraska, the hometown of two of its founders, L. H. Griffith and E. Blewett, its boundaries are the ship canal to the south, Stone Way N. to the east, N. 50th Street to the north, and 8th Avenue N.W. to the west. Sometimes referred to as “The People’s Republic of Fremont” or “The Artists’ Republic of Fremont,” and at one time a center of Seattle’s counterculture, Fremont has evolved to become home to some of the city’s best restaurants, a thriving shopping area of small boutiques, and tech giants Getty Images, Adobe Systems, Google as well as others. Gentrified but still embracing it’s own quirky style, Fremont remains a center for some of Seattle’s most off-beat public art, including a statue of Lenin salvaged from Slovakia, the Fremont Troll, an old rocket fuselage which adorns the side of a building, and Waiting for the Interurban — the statue most likely to be dressed to celebrate the season or a special occasion.

The Fremont Arts Council sponsors several highly attended annual events in Fremont, including the Summer Solstice Parade and Pageant, and the Fremont Sunday Market, held weekly adjacent to the Fremont Bridge.